Determining Scope of Practice for Advanced Practice Registered Nurses (APRNs)

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The American Nurses Association (ANA) is often asked questions regarding the scope of practice of advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs). 

 “Is it within the scope of practice for a nurse practitioner to __________?”
 “I’m an Acute Care NP being asked to see pediatric patients – is that within my scope of practice?”
 “Do certified nurse-midwives see male patients?”
 “Do Clinical Nurse Specialists have prescribing privileges?”

 Answers to questions like these are rarely simple. One must consider

  1. Scope and Standards of Practice
  2. State Law and Regulation
  3. Institutional Policies and Procedures
  4. Self-Determination
  5. Professional Liability and Risk Management Concerns

 

These Web pages provide an essential foundation for understanding each of these areas, as well as links to additional resources.

[Once you have read these pages, if you still have questions about the scope of practice of an advanced practice nurse, please contact us.  We hope this information is useful and appreciate your feedback.]

 Considerations 1-4 (listed above) are depicted graphically in "A Model for Defining Practice and Acceptable Competence"
The ANA Committee on Nursing Practice Standards and Guidelines has formulated a model to clarify the roles and relationships associated with regulation of all nursing practice. The model recognizes the contributions of professional and specialty nursing organizations, educational institutions, credentialing and accrediting organizations, and regulatory agencies; clarifies the role of workplace policies and procedures; and confirms the individual nurse’s ultimate responsibility and accountability for defining nursing practice.
The ANA Committee on Nursing Practice Standards and Guidelines has formulated a model to clarify the roles and relationships associated with regulation of all nursing practice. The model recognizes the contributions of professional and specialty nursing organizations, educational institutions, credentialing and accrediting organizations, and regulatory agencies; clarifies the role of workplace policies and procedures; and confirms the individual nurse’s ultimate responsibility and accountability for defining nursing practice. This model is relevant regardless of the degree or level of nursing being practiced.

Keep A Professional File At Your Fingertips and Up-to-Date
We recommend that each APRN maintain a professional file that contains a copy of all of the documents necessary for credentialing and clinical privileging (academic transcripts, evidence of certification, active license, etc.) as well as each of the documents described here (relevant Standards for Practice, state laws and regulations, delineation of privileges, etc.)
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